TV Series Review

Review, Lethal Weapon 2 Remake the Chemistry

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It will be an action movie series called lethal weapon, which fox has made into a TV series and will launch on Wednesday night. You may remember the first film in 1987: Mel Gibson, when he was funny, was a suicidal cop and his sleaze partner, Murtaugh, played by Danny Glover.
It’s a conceit that requires the two actors to be in a special way in sync, but also makes room for good action and the occasional dark moment. Gibson and glover handled it fairly well, but they both ended up victims of a plethora of complications. In the series, Damon Wayans plays Murtaugh and Clayne Crawford plays Riggs. Their chemistry isn’t instantaneous, but at the end of the premiere, you can at least see their potential.

In Living Color

Wayans from “In Living Color” and other TV shows have given Murtaugh a natural affinity. As the series began, Murtaugh had just returned to the lapd from heart surgery, and his aversion to high-adrenaline tasks was understandable. Crawford (” correction “) as riggs faces an even more daunting task. Riggs had just returned to Texas, where he had been transferred to the police department after a terrible personal loss.

The chemistry between the two may develop, but it’s unclear whether the writers will keep up with the plot, as suicide is clearly involved in the premiere, but probably not at all. A good measure of how quickly crime shows dry up is how early they turn to “but he’s left-handed!” This is a good time to solve the case. This is the first half hour of the first episode, well.

If lethal weapon has at least some potential, then wolverine is hard to say. Wolverine, another ’80s reboot, AIRS Friday on CBS. The show ran for seven seasons on ABC from 1985. The play tells the story of Angus MacGyver’s heroism. He was a secret agent who battled malfeasance by temporarily manipulating solutions to serious problems.

Richard Dean Anderson brought the original show to life with charm and energy. Lucas Till, the 2016 version of the character of the same name, didn’t make much of an impression at the premiere because the chemical and biological weapons involved fell into the wrong hands. It’s nice to see “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation” George Eads reprise his role as Jack Dalton, one of Mr. McGiver’s disaster prevention partners, but the show’s storyline has stalled.

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Next up is a feature called “MacGyver In Cuba,” where the cast (i.e., executive producer Craig O ‘neill and stunt coordinator Jeff Wolfe) discuss filming the opening episode of the first season. This is a great behind-the-scenes look at the action sequences shot on location in Cuba, and then gets some pickup shots back to their hometown of Atlanta, Georgia (where most of the series was filmed).

And then we move on to “save the world, season two.” The special features a brief overview of the season and highlights several episodes, with comments from cast and crew members.

It’s always nice to hear the people involved comment on a particular scene they like or on the difficulty of doing a stunt. This is definitely one of my favorite features.

Our fifth list of special features is self-explanatory: “MacGyver: special and visual effects.” Aside from the gag scroll, which is probably the shortest entry on the list, we really only see two or three mentioned effects. With such a gimmicky TV series, I think the film could have had more content, and I admit I’m not impressed with the film. For me, the highlight of any movie or TV series is to treat the actors as real people. Yes, it’s a gag scroll. As expected, more gags came from George Ezekiel and Justin timberlake, but there were also plenty of cuts from the cast.

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Extra Features

If you’re a fan of the show, the DVD has plenty to offer, starting Sept. 18 at a suggested retail price of $29.98. It’s a battle of chemistry and intelligence that replayed itself in the 1980s. The winner is — well, neither is mandatory, but if you have to watch one, watch the chemistry. It will be an action movie series called lethal weapon, which fox has made into a TV series and will launch on Wednesday night. You may remember the first film in 1987: Mel Gibson, when he was funny, was a suicidal cop and his sleaze partner, Murtaugh, played by Danny Glover.

It’s a conceit that requires the two actors to be in a special way in sync, but also makes room for good action and the occasional dark moment. Gibson and glover handled it fairly well, but they both ended up victims of a plethora of complications. In the series, Damon Wayans plays Murtaugh and Clayne Crawford plays Riggs. Their chemistry isn’t instantaneous, but at the end of the premiere, you can at least see their potential.

Next up is a feature called “MacGyver In Cuba,” where the cast (i.e., executive producer Craig O ‘neill and stunt coordinator Jeff Wolfe) discuss filming the opening episode of the first season. This is a great behind-the-scenes look at the action sequences shot on location in Cuba, and then gets some pickup shots back to their hometown of Atlanta, Georgia (where most of the series was filmed). And then we move on to “save the world, season two.” The special features a brief overview of the season and highlights several episodes, with comments from cast and crew members. It’s always nice to hear the people involved comment on a particular scene they like or on the difficulty of doing a stunt. This is definitely one of my favorite features.

Our fifth list of special features is self-explanatory: “MacGyver: special and visual effects.” Aside from the gag scroll, which is probably the shortest entry on the list, we really only see two or three mentioned effects. With such a gimmicky TV series, I think the film could have had more content, and I admit I’m not impressed with the film. For me, the highlight of any movie or TV series is to treat the actors as real people. Yes, it’s a gag scroll. As expected, more gags came from George Ezekiel and Justin timberlake, but there were also plenty of cuts from the cast. Finally, we enter the “delete scene”, which is always interesting. Usually one can understand why a scene was cut, but it’s still a treat to see the missing footage of the episode on the cutting room floor. Over the course of the season, we’ve seen a dozen scenes that are perfect for those of us who don’t have enough “MacGyver” in our lives.

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